Thursday, 15 December 2011

Wine of the week - Christmas Special III - Bordeaux (Red/France)

Hi all,
10 days left until Christmas! This week, Christmas dinner part three: a roast beef. To go with it, an easy-drinking good value Bordeaux 2007 from Chateau Méaume @ £7.99.

What it is
Red Bordeaux Supérieur from Chateau Méaume, located only 15kms from Saint Emilion and Pomerol areas. Made from Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon.

What to expect
Appearance: Deep ruby colour
Nose: Subtle mix of vanilla, ripe plum and a touch of cedar.
Palate: Very soft and smooth from start to finish: very fresh, fruity attack (plum juice flowing), soft texture with darker fruit flavours building up gently before medium tannins let go softly. Fine balance between fruit and acidity.
EASY DRINKING BORDEAUX: ULTRA SMOOTH WITH SOFT PLUM, VANILLA & CEDAR FLAVOURS. NO MORE, NO LESS.
Score: 8/10 (wine shown)
You’ll like it if you like: plums, vanilla, lighter fruity reds (e.g. Bardolino, Valpolicella, Tempranillo), other ‘softer’ Bordeaux e.g. Margaux, St Emilion, Pomerol.
Have it with
The Christmas Roast beef: a beautiful Red wine glazed roast beef. Yum!
Where to find it
1) Majestic - £7.99 (when you buy 2). Excellent value and very difficult to dislike.
2) Sainsburys - £7.49 (1/2 price) Lussac Saint Emilion. Probably a bit fuller but decent alternative for the price. Similar offer in Waitrose.
3) Tesco - £13.79. Chateau Lapelletrie Saint Emilion 75Cl. Merlot dominated.
Did you know
> Bordeaux produces a fair amount of wine with about 700 million bottles a year. 89% of Bordeaux wines are red but you can find some gorgeous dry whites (Sauvignon Blanc, Sémillon), sweet whites (Sémillon) and even Sparkling.
> The first wines from Bordeaux date back from 48AD when Romans established vineyards for their occupying soldiers.
> Bordeaux is an ideal place for growing vines: its soils are heavy in calcium, its climate benefits from the drainage of the Gironde, Garonne and the cooling, tempering influence Atlantic Ocean.
> Claret is an English term to describe the Red Bordeaux. The term is derived (deformed?) from vinum clarum or clairet, a dark pink wine exported from France to England in medieval times. If Claret has become synonym for red Bordeaux, Clairet is sold as a rosé and still exists in Bordeaux.
> ‘Bordeaux Supérieur’’s authorised yields are lower vs. normal Bordeaux. This should normally result in a further concentration of sugar and flavours in the fruit.
> Cabernet Sauvignon, the star grape of the Bordeaux region, is now proven to be a crossing of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc. The crossing happened naturally in the vineyards that planted both in the old days.
> Best recent vintages in descending order: 2005, 2009, 2001, 2003 and 2008.
> Chateau Méaume has been British-owned since 1980!
Bordeaux is a very very vast topic so very happy to answer any question on the topic!
Otherwise, try  http://www.bordeaux.com/
Cheers! Santé! Salud! Salute!
:@lex

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